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April 2018

Brauer Lecture: Dr. Mina Aganagic

April 10, 2018 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

The Alfred Brauer Lectures April 10 – 12, 2018 Dr. Mina Aganagic Professor of Mathematics and Physics, University of California, Berkeley   Dr. Mina Aganagic is Professor of Mathematics and Physics at the University of California, Berkeley.  She has a bachelor's degree and a doctorate from the California Institute of Technology, in 1995 and 1999 respectively. After a postdoctoral position at the Harvard University Physics Department and a faculty position at the University of Washington, she moved to UC Berkeley…

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Brauer Lecture: Dr. Mina Aganagic

April 11, 2018 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

The Alfred Brauer Lectures April 10 – 12, 2018 Dr. Mina Aganagic Professor of Mathematics and Physics, University of California, Berkeley   Dr. Mina Aganagic is Professor of Mathematics and Physics at the University of California, Berkeley.  She has a bachelor's degree and a doctorate from the California Institute of Technology, in 1995 and 1999 respectively. After a postdoctoral position at the Harvard University Physics Department and a faculty position at the University of Washington, she moved to UC Berkeley…

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Brauer Lecture: Dr. Mina Aganagic

April 12, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

The Alfred Brauer Lectures April 10 – 12, 2018 Dr. Mina Aganagic Professor of Mathematics and Physics, University of California, Berkeley   Dr. Mina Aganagic is Professor of Mathematics and Physics at the University of California, Berkeley.  She has a bachelor's degree and a doctorate from the California Institute of Technology, in 1995 and 1999 respectively. After a postdoctoral position at the Harvard University Physics Department and a faculty position at the University of Washington, she moved to UC Berkeley…

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Subodh Sharma, Dean of Science, Kathmandu University – Joint Applied Math, Marine Sciences, and Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology Seminar

April 27, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Joint Applied Math, Marine Sciences, and Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology Seminar Location: Chapman Hall, Room 211, 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Refreshments available before the seminar at 2:30 pm in Phillips Hall, Room 365. Speaker:  Subodh Sharma, Dean of Science, Kathmandu University Title:  Alarming Signs of Climate Change in the Himalaya

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October 2018

Andrei Gabrielov, Purdue University – Special Colloquium

October 8, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Title: Classification of Spherical and Circular Quadrilaterals Abstract: A spherical polygon (membrane) is a bordered surface homeomorphic to a closed disc, with $n$ distinguished boundary points called corners, equipped with a Riemannian metric of constant curvature 1, except at the corners where it has conical singularities, and such that the boundary arcs between the corners are geodesic. Spherical polygons with $n=3$ and $n=4$ are called spherical triangles and quadrilaterals, respectively. This is a very old problem, related to the properties…

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Pedro Saenz, MIT – Applied Physical Sciences (APS) Colloquium

October 15, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Location: Chapman 125 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Speaker: Pedro Saenz, instructor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Applied Mathematics Title: Spin lattices of walking droplets Abstract: Understanding the self-organization principles and collective dynamics of non-equilibrium matter remains a major challenge despite considerable progress over the last decade. In this talk, I will introduce a hydrodynamic analog system that allows us to investigate simultaneously the wave-mediated self-propulsion and interactions of effective spin degrees of freedom in inertial and rotating…

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November 2018

Xiang Cheng, University of Minnesota – Applied Physical Sciences Colloquium

November 5, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Title: From Flocking Birds to Swarming Bacteria: A Study of the Dynamics of Active Fluids Abstract: Active fluids are a novel class of non-equilibrium complex fluids with examples across a wide range of biological and physical systems such as flocking animals, swarming microorganisms, vibrated granular rods, and suspensions of synthetic colloidal swimmers. Different from familiar non-equilibrium systems where free energy is injected from boundaries, an active fluid is a dispersion of large numbers of self- propelled units, which convert the ambient/internal free…

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February 2019

Jeremie Palacci, Physics Department, UCSD – APS Colloquium

February 4, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Title: Carving non-equilibrium pathways to control self-assembly Abstract: Active particles are microscopic particles, which can inject energy locally and made available by recent progress in colloidal science. They are ideal “pump-probes” to explore the emergent properties in non-equilibrium soft systems and control the behavior of soft matter and self-assembly at the microscale. In this talk, I will demonstrate how we can use dissipative building blocks to control self-assembly and show the robust formation of dynamical superstructures using active particles that consume fuel…

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May 2019

Peter Constantin, Princeton University – Brauer Lecture Day 1

May 1, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Overall Title: "Fluid nonlinearity" Lecture I: Smooth and dissipative solutions of Euler equations, Navier-Stokes equations and the zero viscosity limit. Abstract: I will describe briefly basic questions of the area. Then I will discuss some of the recent results: 1) smooth multiscale solutions with compactly supported velocity and 2) conditions away from the boundary for the zero viscosity limit to be given by possibly dissipative solutions of Euler equations.     Biography: Dr. Peter Constantin, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. Dr. Peter Constantin holds…

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Peter Constantin, Princeton University – Brauer Lecture Day 2

May 2, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Overall Title: “Fluid nonlinearity” Lecture II: Nernst-Planck-Navier-Stokes Equation Abstract: I will describe recent work concerning this system of equations describing ionic diffusion in fluids in the presence of boundaries with different kinds of properties.     Biography: Dr. Peter Constantin, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. Dr. Peter Constantin holds degrees from the University of Bucharest, where he graduated "summa cum laude" in 1975, and from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he received his PhD in 1981 with Professor Shmuel Agmon as his advisor. From…

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