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Hsiao-Ying Shadow Huang (NCSU), Applied Mathematics Colloquium

October 6, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Title: Phenomenological-Based Constitutive Modeling and Structural-Based Computational Modeling of Biological Tissues

Abstract: Constitutive laws are mathematical models used to explicitly describe the behavior of materials. These material specific laws are either data driven (i.e., phenomenological-based constitutive models) or constrained by the microstructural level interactions in the material (i.e., structural constitutive models). This talk highlights these two approaches to understand anisotropic nonlinear mechanical behavior of vascular and skeletal tissues. First, jugular venous tissues, a group of functional tissues that have been implicated in diseases ranging from venous hypertension and venous valve incompetence, are modeled by adopting suitable strain energy function via the constant invariant mechanical testing, followed by additional biaxial testing to estimate parameters of the constitutive relations. This study can be of support to form a continuum model required for numerical analyses and simulations of fluid–structure interactions. Second, the tendon-to-bone insertion tissue (i.e., the enthesis), a graded connective tissue whose anisotropic biomechanical functions depend intimately on the regional biochemical composition and structure, is modeled by adopting the nonlinear anisotropic Gasser-Ogden-Holzapfel model. Collagen fiber orientations and dispersions, as well as mineralization concentrations are included in this structural-based computational model. The in-silico models are verified by comparing to the in-situ biaxial mechanical testing results, thereby serving as translational tools for accurately predicting the material behavior of the tendon-to-bone insertions.

Location: Phillips Hall 332, 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm, with tea served in Phillips 330 at 3:30 pm.

Details

Date:
October 6, 2017
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Event Category:

Venue

Phillips 332